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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too easy. the adversaries are now friends, really good friends. and when we asked to meet with them, they suggested a personal spot. david boyce's apartment in new york city. if anybody had said to me nine years ago that i would about to be interviewing the two men who fought each other tooth and nail in bush versus gore on the same side of a constitutional fight, i would have said, are you crazy? >> actuall
them to do as the civil right issue of their time. at the end of the day when you have u.s. citizens citizens andl permanent residents being unlawfully detained in immigration raids you feel like you're a second class citizen. >> the dream act has been floating around for years. republicans introduced the achieve act, yet the hispanic caucus rejected that. why? >> the problem with the achieve act, it doesn't achieve the dream. the dream is to take young people who came here through no choice of their own, their parents brought them, who only flag they recognize and pledge allegiance to is that of the united states, whose only national anthem they know is the star spangled banner, their only country they know is the united states, is a positioned to be a pathway towards earned permanent residency. >> you fought this issue for so long. due think there can be a bipartisan solution? >> for the first time in many years, i am cautiously optimistic. there is a working group of eight senators, four republicans, four democrats, a similar working group is being put together in the house of rep
, or latino organizations, it's civil rights organizations, the labor movement, it's evangelicals, parts of the business community. there will be immigration reform in 2013 and the president will be forced to sign something that gets through congress whether he wants to or not. it's clear he does want to. >> it appears he wants to. the dream act, here we are in lame duck again, lame duck in 2010 was the great exciting moment for progressives. a thousand things that hadn't happened pineally happened. no particular conversation about another dream act again. >> let's keep in mind. i'm not as optimistic about the future of ledge indication as you. in the context of the immigration problem, immigration policy problem, let's say, in the united states, dreamers and the dream act is symbolic. it aekts a lot of people. it's symbolic in a universe where we have 10 million or 11 million or however many in the shadows. we have 141,000 visas a year. what the hell is that? >> it's that history, right? >> it is that history. >> it's bur okay tra advertised this kind of stuff. it's not a solution of ex
, and in some states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfire
the country? and all the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand-your-ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone. they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, mars, proctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed. and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators. we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> all right, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan, and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in looking at them. and i
which is now going to be taking up the civil rights issue of our time will reach the same result that the district court did and the 9th circuit did and well find that proposition 8 unlawfully discriminates against gay lesbian couple here in the state of california. >>reporter: in sacramento this afternoon a spokesman for supporters of proposition 8 is confident the hay court will support the ban on same sex marriage. >> i expect 4 or 5 justices to uphold proposition 8. why? because the constitution of the united states doesn't have marriage in it. and 10th amendment says what is not in the federal powers belongs to the state. >> high court 0could go either way. lawyers trying to turn over prop 8 said they will argue very broad argument before the high court that there was no justification for discrimination. we will know the high court decision probably next june. reporting from city hall, abc 7 news. >> major roadway in eastern contra costa county is still closed after 2 people died in a horrible crash. we flew above the scene on byron highway at clifton court just after
of this next topic. we go to what could be the civil rights case of a generation or cases plural. the supreme court has decided to take up two challenges to same-sex marriage. nbc justice correspondent pete williams has the story from washington. hello, pete. >> reporter: alex this is a big deal. the u.s. supreme court has never been agreed to take a serious look at the issue of same-sex marriages. now it will. the justices will consider at least these two questions. can the federal government refuse to recognize same sex marges in the states they're already legal. secondly what's to become of them in california. just a day after washington state became the latest allowing gay couples to get married, the supreme court said it will delve into one of the nation's most hotly debated issues. >> the highest court in the land has decided to take up what will be one of the biggest civil rights cases this court could ever hear. >> reporter: the court agreed to take up the legal battle over california's proposition 8, passed by voters four years ago ending same-sex marriage in the state. a firm appeal
that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards. >> that's what the treaty does. it seds down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i kneel happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me the from voting. let's find out how it worked. we'll be right back. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are re
in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: president obama today, in washington, assured business executives he'll reject attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way sugg
to get them until the 70's for the most part. one of the great victories as it turns out of the civil rights movements and its impact on the democratic party a fiscal crisis with the state in the 1970's, a tax revolt, inflation, except for a. of finance and discipline. so you can have an expansion of state programs and more. the balance of forces. a great victory in the 1970's is to stop the banks redlining in terms of loans. community reinvestment act. a major reform. no question. you try to solve the terrible urban plight of the american city by giving the banks to lend and that integrate them into the financial system. very small at the stage. the kennedy reinvestment act is fairly kosher and terms of the way in which it's making those loans. by the 1990's, there is an explosion of mortgage debt and to black communities, enormous pride that the world is trying to buy secondary mortgages. the treasury proudly says so. and then every shares turned to business. the congressional inquiry and the crisis shows that 10,000 people in florida who were selling mortgages and florida have the
. not only was he known for intricate rhythms, also he was a huge civil rights advocate and activist, i should say, as well. and he was one of the handful of white musicians, jazz musicians, in the 1950s. and you know, let's take a listen here of some of his songs. ♪ >> amazing. amazing. so i could just sit and listen to him all over again, for the entire show. i want to move on because i want to talk about we said that niemeye reshg w niemeyer was 104 but that's nothing compared to the world's oldest woman. >> bessie, who passed away at 116 and he's a georgia native. the world's oldest woman lived to be 122 and she's a french woman. all these individuals regardless of their circumstances and what they did in their lives, they left a legacy and that's the thing to remember here and they left their footprints and fingerprints all over their work. >> can you imagine, 122? >> i don't know. what would you do? >> whatever i wanted. 122, i'd do whatever i wanted and say whatever i wanted. all right. thank you. appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> how is the nfl playing with the recent player tr
of marriage, kenji. when loving -- it's actually post '64 civil rights act. past the voting rights act. these other issues had been taken care of in terms of legislation. but there was still the need to redress the issue of interracial marriage. >> they forget this try cot mi between the social rights. the idea of rights of association as being the last untouchable place where equality norms would penetrate, i think it's really the tact that marriage is always the last thing, right? so as you say, 1967 is lovey versus virginia. employment discrimination, 13 years after brown versus board of education. the supreme court had a marriage case on its bokt in 1956. but kicked it. because it didn't want to touch it with a ten-foot pole so waited for more states to come around. it's also the year that guess who's coming to dinner comes out. there's a cultural legal convergence. we're at that moment for the gay community now. one of the historians in the gay marriage trial, nancy kauts, a historian of marriage, she said one of the emancipated slaves after -- the slaves flocked to get married. s
with the civil rights movement. i do not think that is appropriate. to make it equal with the civil rights with other minorities, i do not think that is right. i think marriage has been defined between a man and a woman to raise our children. we need to continue that, the country is really corroding in terms of morals and values. it will further deteriorated. i think this is a state's right to rule on this, not a supreme court ruling for all of the people. the people should have a voice in whether or not this is acceptable for them. host: that is the last call we will take on this. coming up, we will look at the november jobs report that came out yesterday. joining us for that discussion to talk about the numbers and give us some context is rick newman. we are going to focus on the state of health of the interim america. thomas frieden will be our guest. all weekend long, the history and literary life of albany, new york, capital city. our producers gathered about programming while they were there. there are traveling to state capital to feature history and literary life as he will see fro
that every, kind of a civil right. every worker should have that right in my opinion. bill: you're of the free economics mind anyway. >> that's true. bill: you will argue this will help michigan's economy, in a word you're saying yes? >> definitely. bill: matt, what do you think impact of the law could be? >> if you look at numbers, bill, steve hit it right on the head. 2001 to 2011, look at right to work states. inflation adjusted compensation rose private sector employees 12%, versus nonright to work states only increased by 3%. what happens when you make more money you increase the amount of people that want to move to your state. in that same time frame again, look at right to work states, saw the population from 25 to 34 increase 11.3%. in nonright to work states, increase .6. what all the numbers mean, more people move to your state, more tax revenue, more jobs, more companies coming there. if you put it together it is great for the local economy. bill: here are some more numbers and these are staggering, guys. unemployment in michigan is 9%. you know, across the country,
a person in custody and no further details about the case were available. >> the oscar a great civil rights case was back in court yesterday lawyers for his the state john burris and dan siegel argued the ruling against johannes mehswrle and the other two board officers involved in the incident leading to grants murder should not be overturned. a federal judge ruled in may 2011 that barred cannot be held legally response for the 2009 shooting death of foster grant at oakland's fourth fail bart station. the judge wrote a $50 million federal lawsuit against the former bart police officer should be decided in a trout. >> deficit gabor supplies is expected to make its final decision on the to dry banyan on nudity. plenty of people will be on hand today as a surprise meeting. and many will oppose the ban, a plan to strip down the meeting. it would not be the first time. last month the board initially approved the ban on nude with a narrow 65 vote. several people took off their clothes and protests. if the ban is finalized, it would take effect on february 1st. i was start on that-that at one und
this the civil rights issue of our time, but many also express uncertainty that the high court isn't evolved enough to rule on. what's your take? >> well, i think that we certainly have seen a change in the tide from the president saying that his position has evolved on this to certainly the polls. the polls have indicated clearly that the american people have changed greatly in their posturing towards not just civil unions but the right to marry. so marriage equality is front and center. not only for millennials, but people of all age groups and all walks of life. you have democrats and republicans even agreeing on this issue. at this point, people are finding a common thread. that's the right for human beings, american people that look like you and i and eothers. >> matt, there are a variety of possible outcomes. let's start with doma. if that is struck down by the high court, thewill that be thed of conservatives' attempts of outlawing gay marriage? >> it is the mother of all federal laws to try to outlaw. it will be over it it's overturned. if social conservatives try to get smart about
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
. and policy is important too there is a whole question around civil rights. i would argue way behind. but representation matters. jay-z famously said on his most recent album, when you see me, see you. politics works the same way. you want success to be shared. you want it to be represented. and i would urge the republicans to think long and hard about how to have a leadership structure that looks more like america. >> you just dropped the mic. i love it. i love it. more from the brain trust on the other side of this break as the supreme court is about to take up same-sex marriage. it is being called a watershed moment in the fight for marriage equality. we'll talk about that on the other side of this break. lashawn's got her christmas list. she's looking for a fijit at toys "r" us. let's see if we can get the same item at walmart for less? okay. fijit friends. fifteen bucks on rollback. wow! that's a savings of over 29 bucks! twenty-nine bucks!!?? and they're powered by friendship. see for yourself if you could save on the brands you want. walmart. >>> this is a monumental action by
from demanding respect for civil and political rights." end quote. the cuban government should release all political prisoners. the cuban government should also release allen gross, the american who has been jailed for more than three years now for distributing telephones in cuba. as i understand it, he is in poor health and a humanitarian parole is more than justified. when we hear about the cuban government's policies toward its people, the repression of their basic freedoms, the persecution of political dissidents, it's understandable to want to punish the government and to weaken it so that it collapses. we have to ask ourselves if our goal is to punish the cuban government or instead to help the cuban people. our goal should be to help the cuban people. further, we have to ask ourselves whether continuing the embargo will accomplish that goal. in my view, the answer is clearly no. it defies belief and 50 years of historical evidence to think that continuing the embargo will result in the toppling of the castro regime. that regime has survived 50 years of sanctions. fidel castro is
now. heather: right now the brutal civil war raging in syria, now you know inching closer to the capital of damascus. new video shows plumes of smoke rising over the skyline. rebel fighters are turning their attention to damascus airport as they try to choke off supplies for the assad regime. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is following all of this from the pentagon. good morning. >> reporter: good morning heather. the pent gone continues actively plan for contingencies for syria, more tough words from the president obama's national security team. >> christians, jews, men, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future and a future of this kind can not possibly include assad. >> reporter: the administration has been reluctant to get involved militarily in syria for the past 20 months of fighting but recognizes it will likely get drawn in to fill the vacuum when assad goes which is seen as inevitability at this point. pentagon planners recognize they can't sit on the sidelines. there is increasing evidence some of the shoul
happy. >> stephanie: happy as a clown. but you don't think your brother has a right to get married? >> caller: they can have civil liberties but as far as marriage that's between a man and woman. you can adopt a kid, and think about it two men having a kid two women having a kid. really that would be a miracle, right? >> stephanie: well, yeah. what does mr. road flair mary do? >> caller: mr. road flair mary? >> your husband. >> stephanie: what does he do? >> caller: he drives a truck. >> stephanie: oh congratulations. don't you think i should be able to be married for 31 years. >> caller: yes. >> stephanie: oh i tricked you. >> caller: listen, i marched in the gay parades in chicago with my brother. >> stephanie: you did? >> caller: civil liberties, fine. but marriage know. >> stephanie: i feel we have made progress. maybe you are right. maybe couples therapy is bull [ censor bleep ]. >> caller: you can go to therapy, pay the money, do what you want. i don't play that way. i don't need somebody telling me how to live. >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: think about it, i c
attacks on former high-ranking officials. >>> right now, a developing story from the civil war in syria. senior u.s. officials tell abc news, president bashar assad's forces have loaded nerve gas components into bombs at or near syrian airfields. it is assumed, the intent was to move the bombs onto aircraft. but there's no way to know if that happened for certain. the issue, of course, has the full attention of the obama administration. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons or might lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> syrian ground forces and rebels have been battling in and around syrian capital of damascus. it is now estimated that more than 40,000 people have been killed in violence in march 2011. >> just an atrocity there. >>> now to the pink slips at citigroup. the company is slashing 11,000 jobs worldwide. about 4% of its work force. more than half of those cuts will come from consumer banking. and they are aimed at saving $900 billion next year alone. investors were apparen
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
pherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the realization that lincoln had promulgated -- [inaudible] the union had commenced -- the tennessee cumberland and mississippi rivers seems to belong to the north, not the south. and i must've seen for a time in 1862 that the combination of events, particularly the successes of the union were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line shifts. being the father of water that lincoln was now became vexed all over again. jim talent start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of 61 and 62, in the spring of 62. and it looked like they were going to open up the missi
conservatives will likely rebel. more "bill press" up after the break. we will be right back. exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new cooling relief! ugh. how do you feel? now i'm cold. hmm. this is a better choice. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. ahhh. not just a sensation sensational relief. did you get chips for the party? nope. cheese plate? che
is not forcing either of you guys out, right? >> that's pretty true. >> it might work the other way, rush. >> jim demint's defection is just the latest sign of a republican party simply in shambles. seems to me there's a civil war inside the party of grover norquist as well. you'll notice that only 10% of voters agree with his anti-tax policies. republican kingmaker karl rove is on the outs after his election night meltdown on fox news. he's been kicked off fox news until further notice. tea party organizer dick armey, what happened to him? he has split from freedom works. the tea party group that he actually formed. he walked with $8 million. everywhere you look, republicans are in disarray. it's almost like they never planned for a scenario in which barack obama was going to win re-election. the problems don't end here. say what you want about jim demint's positions, at least he was the well-connected -- he was the well connected to the republican establishment. moderate republicans believed demint could keep the radicals in line. the same certainly can't be said for tea party senators jim demi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)